Mispronounced Food Words

 

Globalization has brought the world’s cuisine at our feet. While we savour the amazing world delicacies, Mispronounced Food Words are the new oops in the food industry. We may have all the knowledge of the world about food and cuisines, but there is one place where we are lagging and that is pronouncing them correctly. After a lot of brainstorming we bring to you these minimalist designs that will give you 15 Mispronounced Food Words along with their correct pronunciations. These will help you to say it correctly the next time you are ordering your favourite dish.

We have just tried to put across the way these food words are pronounced originally. Dialectal variations will be there across all countries. Our attempt is to get to the root of the origin of these food words and check how they are pronounced in the place of their origin. If you think that there are several other words that you’d like us to add to this list, please share in comments. This is not attempt to insult, put down or mock anyone’s pronunciation pattern. This is just an attempt to show you how the world pronounces a certain food word based on it’s area and culture of origin. Whether you’d like to pick these up or not is entirely a personal choice. We have listed down some of the most basic food items that have now found a way in our kitchens and dinner tables. There are several others of course, but keeping in mind the universality of the ingredients we listed down these 15 that are used across the globe.

Have a look!

Mispronounced Food Words -AlmondMispronounced Food Words - QuinoaMispronounced Food Words - Raspberry

Proper pronunciation of CocoaProper pronunciation of OnionProper pronunciation of Herb Proper pronunciation of Bruschetta

Proper pronunciation of Buffet

Proper pronunciation of caramelProper pronunciation of Hummus

Proper pronunciation of Pasta

Proper pronunciation of Salmon

Proper pronunciation of Jalapeno

Proper pronunciation of Espresso

Proper pronunciation of Tortillas

Mispronounced Food Words issue solved!

If you have any more, do share in comments and your name could feature in our next design!

You may also like Good Friends and Best Friends

Even More DigToKnow

Even More

  • Apoorv Sharma

    well , in India , the English we speak is influenced from UK so its right to call herbs ‘herbs’ . ‘Erbs’ is the US pronunciation which we normally don’t speak.

    • Thank you for the update. Will keep the British/American accent pattern in check the next time.

      • Phil Shoore

        It’s all British here. I looked up “buffet” so there are two ways of pronouncing it. And the US one (the one that is wrong here) is much closer to the French language where the word comes from.
        And Humous starts with a “CH” sound as in “Chanukah”.
        But thank you for the espresso. The mystery X always grates on me!

    • NoniDoll

      +1 for Australia also pronouncing the ‘h’ in herbs, like the UK.

      (Why do I get the feeling this is going to be like fahrenheit/celsius?)

    • SarreqTeryx

      American who says “Herbs”, here. annoys me every single time someone “corrects” my pronunciation

  • Monica Vaid Varia

    Lots of things are actually very wrong here. Erbs?! Ahmund? Not at all!! The constant Indian wrong pronunciation of the word buffet annoys me to the core! It is not boofet but buffet! Sorry to say but please check your facts before posting this as people’s English will mess up!

  • Monica Vaid Varia

    Ah nion?! Bru sketa?? No!!

    • Monica Vaid Variya, perhaps this might help!
      Bruschetta

      • Monica Vaid Varia

        yes its “chetta” not “sketa”!!
        Please do your research before posting wrong information on the English language.

        • jcdent

          From Wikipedia: “In Italian, bruschetta is pronounced [bruˈsketta]. In English-speaking countries, it is pronounced either /bruːˈskɛtə/, which more closely resembles the Italian pronunciation, or /bruːˈʃɛtə/”

        • SarreqTeryx

          bruschetta is an Italian word, not English. as such, it does not follow English pronunciation “rules”. it is properly pronounced “brew-sketa”, whether you like it or not.

    • SarreqTeryx

      not entirely sure what ah-nion is, un-yun would have been better, but bru-sketa is correct

  • Zahra Dewaswala

    Perfect pronunciations! If you think these are wrong then look up a dictionary

  • Brian Smith

    Congratulations. You have discovered dialect (but completely failed to
    understand or appreciate it.) Check your privilege and try again.

  • SarreqTeryx

    I’d like to nominate Chipotle on 2 fronts. firstly, the erroneous trailing e, it’s chipotl, not chipotle, and pronounced chee-pote-uhl

  • Dave Rowan

    This article is 90% BS. They are basing a lot of the “correct” pronunciations off of Romance language pronunciations. As the words moved into other languages, their pronunciation is changed to accommodate the differences in syntax and diction.

    Yes “Boo-fay” is correct, in French or Spanish, but as the extended U sound is usually accompanied by a correlating and modifying vowel (IE grOUp, pOOr, bOAr), it was given the shorter “uh” sound to fit with english grammar rUlEs (THERE’S ANOTHER!)

    The only two 100% right are jalapeño and espresso. EXPRESSO IS NOT A THING!

  • Dieter Freundlieb

    This is totally useless. The people who put this together obviously haven’t got a clue about linguistics, especially phonetics. The ‘words’ representing the supposedly correct pronunciation are neither written using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) nor the United States Dictionary Transcription. They don’t even indicate which syllable is stressed. So unless you know the correct pronunciation already you don’t know how to pronounce the words correctly It’s just guesswork.

    • Adam Anders

      Exactly. I highly doubt the first syllables in onion and almond are pronounced the same.

  • Stephen Harper

    basil

  • Suzanne Chalmers – AlSaadoon

    Actually it’s hum-mus. It’s Arabic, the Arabic word for chickpea. They don’t say hoom-us.